Archive for the ‘PR’ Category

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Interview with Steve Chambers (@stevie_chambers), Wikibon’s first analyst outside of the US

April 29, 2015

By Rosalind Carr (@Rosalind_at_O) and Rose Ross (@Rose_at_O)

Stevie Chambers

The Countdown Team catch-up with Wikibon‘s newly appointed Senior Analyst Steve Chambers, who is flying the flag for the Wikibon community in the UK. We chat hot topics in cloud for 2015, the best way to pitch him and his favourite industry events of the year…

Leeds_United_-_Logo.svgTell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a living paradox: I love my home town, but I also love global reach.  I love football, but I’m a Leeds United fan.  Most importantly the tech world I came from is being eaten alive, and I’m cheering on Pacman.

Tell us a little bit about your firm and its interest in the cloud. 

Wikibon meets my paradox criteria because it has history and future and I love it because it always aims to look at the crazy world of IT from the perspective of the bamboozled end user.  There’s so much change, variation and hype that it’s a nightmare for enterprise IT to make sense of it all: all those folks want is to make the best informed decision, and I think the channels of Wikibon are one way to help that. Read the rest of this entry ?

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5 golden PR rules for events…

March 4, 2014

By Rosalind Carr @Rosalind_at_O and Rose Ross @Rose_at_O

 ipexpo-exhibitionnewsIn the midst of a busy events period, the O-team have had some tips from Désiré Athow (@desireathow), Editor of TechRadar Pro, and are armed with a trusty event PR checklist at the ready!

 

 

Here are 5 handy hints for PRs looking to make the most of event opportunities with the press…

 1.      Timing is key in the run up to events – Do not wait for the last week to invite journalists to briefings- pitch as early as possible to bag a slot in their diary! With an initial conversation in advance, you’ll also have the time to get a sense of what they’d like to discuss, and can prepare accordingly if a briefing is arranged.

2.      Communicating with the press – Each journalist is different in the way they like to be pitched. For instance, we can definitely understand Désiré’s aversion to out of the blue PR calls pitching interviews with unknown companies. However, there are now so many ways of communicating, that over time, you can gage different journalists’ preferences for contact.

For instance, the old fashioned PR call may be welcomed by press you’ve been in touch with before or those in search of relevant content for an upcoming feature, but perhaps not by a journalist who works part-time, or is on a tight deadline (who may prefer to respond in their own time over email). Alternatively, if they’re a Twitter addict, there’s no harm in a quick tweet to see if they’re interested in what you have to say, you could even get involved with their current discussions if you can contribute something relevant and notable to the conversation.

Knowing your audience goes a long way.

3.      Don’t expect a feature to be written on the back of every briefing – Journalists are often short on time, and may end up writing shorter than expected content pieces. In this case, there are ways that may keep you on their radar for future opportunities. See what they’re chatting about on Twitter/LinkedIn, or download the publication’s forward features to gain a sense of their hot topics in the coming weeks and months!

4.      Unfortunately, no shows can happen – This could be for a number of reasons, but it’s always best to follow up with an offer of a phone briefing, or find out if they’re attending another upcoming event where they can re-schedule the meeting for. Consider your efforts in getting the initial nod from the journalist – better to do a quick follow up, maximising the opportunity at hand and the chance of getting exposure.

5.      Making the most of time with the press   In most cases, journalists’ busy schedules mean they’re not likely to stay at said event from start to finish. If your client is chatting with a journalist without a pre-organised briefing, communicating clear messages that will be of particular interest to them is key.

Have a snoop of the press list in advance if available, and do a little research on who’s attending and if/why they’d be interested in your client.

Overall, understanding and responding to how journalists work will maximise your press success at events.

The common link between these five pointers is preparation and flexibility –such as identifying how best to inform and engage with the journalist, pro-active follow ups, and therefore uncovering future opportunities.

And you’ll be pleased to hear we’ll also be interviewing Desire to find out more about what makes the editor of TechRadar Pro tick

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Social media: connect, appeal and engage!

December 14, 2012

By Rosalind Carr, @Rosalind_at_O

In the last few weeks, the role of social media has been on our minds, and we’ve started to question how many of us really use this platform to its full potential. Everyone’s signed up, but we’re wondering how many accounts stay updated, with content relevant to followers and therefore considered noteworthy…

We’ve also been contemplating how personal social media handles appear, and how they attract leads for the brand that a personal profile represents. Associating a brand with a face builds connections from person to person which are unique, relevant and interactive.

At the Intellect headquarters in London last month, some of the team attended “Marketing and Sales Group Meeting: CRM and Social Business – Reinvigorating the existing and adding the new.” Here the managing director of Redd Marketing, Leigh Hopwood, spoke on how best to utilize your social media and truly connect with and understand your brand’s followers. Hopwood stressed the importance of social media, noting Read the rest of this entry ?

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PR Note on Calling Your Company a “Leader” : Publications Do It, Too

August 2, 2012

By Olivia Shannon, @Olivia_at_O

It’s a delightful story of spin and double standards in the media world…

Journalists often say it annoys them when press releases refer to a company as “leading” or “the leader”—unless, of course, the company actually is the market leader in its industry. You can’t blame them. I imagine it gets tiresome wading through hundreds of press releases from hundreds of companies all boasting they are the “leaders” of their industries, even if that is just plain not true. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New Twitter PR tool: Lissted launched by RealWire to curate the media on Twitter

June 13, 2012

By Olivia Shannon, @olivia_at_o

The Countdown team loves to explore new social media tools, so we were excited today by the news that RealWire, the UK online press release distribution company, has launched Lissted, a new web application based on RealWire’s growing database of over 10,000 journalists, media professionals and outlets on Twitter.

You can use Lissted to find journalists and media outlets (free), listen to relevant conversations going back 30 days (paid), and monitor media mentions of topics, brands and people that are important to you, including email alerts when you aren’t logged on (paid).

Lissted is a Twitter-based tool, so you do need to be on Twitter to use it, as users are required to sign in through their Twitter accounts.

All the details about Lissted, including a pricing guide, can be found here.